Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Food Chemistry and Hydrocolloids Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

John Tsaknis

Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Greece

Keynote: Development of fermented products from donkey milk

Time : 10:00 to 10:25

OMICS International Food Chemistry 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker John Tsaknis photo
Biography:

John Tsaknis has completed his PhD and Post-doctoral studies from Lincolnshire University, School of Food Sciences and is a Chartered Chemist from the RoyalrnSociety of Chemistry, UK. He is full Professor in the School of Food Technology and Nutrition in Athens Greece. He is a member of the Standing Committeern“Residues and Chemical Contaminants” in the International Dairy Federation (IDF) and reviewer of 7 international scientific journals. He has published more thanrn40 papers in reputed journals and participated in more than 30 international conferences and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of reputed journals.

Abstract:

Donkey milk is known as having a composition very close to the human breast milk. Almost same amount of lactose, itsrnhigh protein content and being poor in fat had made it an ideal alternative, which was even thought to have therapeuticrnabilities. Nowadays, donkey milk is again under investigation for the exploration of its functions. Due to its high price andrnlow fat, donkey milk is not considered ideal for commercial use especially for fermented products. The aim of this study wasrnto explore ways of producing a yoghurt-style product from donkey milk using only traditional material and methods. Donkeyrnmilk was used alone and in combination with other milks and also different cultivation methods were tested. Finally, thernmost successful products were tested for their sensory characteristics and their acceptance by the consumers. The results arernencouraging and they indicate that a yoghurt-style product from donkey milk, without additives, is possible with the use ofrnother milk as well –in limited amount- and it may be well received in the market for its sensory characteristics.

Keynote Forum

Carolin Hauser

Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV, Germany

Keynote: Hop extracts – A natural antimicrobial for ensuring food safety

Time : 10:25 to 10:50

OMICS International Food Chemistry 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Carolin Hauser photo
Biography:

Carolin Hauser has completed her PhD in Food Chemistry from Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany and her Post-doctoral studies fromrnUniversity of Santiago de Chile in 2014. In 2016, she was selected as Eleonore-Trefftz Visiting Professor at the Technische Universität Dresden. She is a BusinessrnField Manager for Food at the Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV, Germany. Fraunhofer is the biggest research organization forrnapplied science in Europe. Her research field is preservation of packaged food and food quality. She presented her work in many international congresses andrnpublished papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The common hop (Humulus lupulus) produces numerous bioactive compounds, such as the beta-acids. They show lowerrnbitterness than alpha-acids, but high antibacterial activity - especially against Gram-positive microorganisms like Listeriarnspp. Those bacteria can lead to food-borne illnesses and microbial food spoilage. Especially fresh and minimally processedrnfood is not protected against microbial contamination. Antimicrobial substances can minimize the inherent microbiologicalrnrisk of fresh products and are even able to prolong their shelf-life and increase quality. On the other hand, chemicallyrnsynthesized preservatives get more and more rejected by the consumer. Natural substances are preferred instead. In this study,rnwe investigated the potential of beta-acids containing hop extracts as natural antimicrobials for food preservation againstrnselected foodborne pathogens in vitro as well as their activity against Listeria spp. directly on fresh food products. Anotherrnimportant aspect of our investigation was the physicochemical behavior of the extracts at different processing conditions andrnproduct matrices. The experiments showed that Gram-positive bacteria were strongly inhibited by hop extracts containingrnbeta-acids. Gram-negative bacteria were highly resistant against all tested hop extracts. The inhibitory activity of the hoprnextracts against Listeria on food could also be demonstrated. Consequently, antimicrobial hop extracts could be used as naturalrnpreservatives in food applications to extend the shelf-life and to increase the safety of fresh products.

  • Food Flavour Chemistry | Hydrophilic Colloids in Food Industry | Food Storage and Preservation | Role of Bioactive Constituents | Equipments and Techniques | Food Dairy: Science, Research & Sustainability
Location: Algonquin AB

Session Introduction

Fernando Dourado

University of Minho, Portugal

Title: Bacterial nano cellulose –A novel marketable food hydrocolloid
Speaker
Biography:

Fernando Dourado is a Post-Doc Researcher at the Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho. With a PhD in Chemical and Biological Engineering, he has been working on the modification of BNC for several biotechnological applications. He has also been working on the development of a large-scale BNC production system. He Co-founded BC Technologies, Ltd., a start-up that uses its integrated R&D capabilities, to provide scientific and technological solutions for the food and biomedical industry, using BNC; he is also the Co-founder, shareholder and member of the board of administration of Satisfibre, S.A., an emerging company engaged in the large-scale production of BNC.

Abstract:

Food hydrocolloids find a widespread use for thickening and jellification of aqueous solutions, stabilization of foams, emulsions and dispersions, inhibition of ice and sugar crystal formation and the controlled release of flavours, etc. Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) is an outstanding polymer extruded by Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans (formerly Gluconacetobacter xylinus) to yield a 3D nanofibrilar pure cellulosic network. BNC exhibits high tensile strength, in situ moldability, water holding capacity, biocompatibility and biodegradability. These unique properties allowed exploring its potential mostly in the biomedical field, where temporary skin substitutes and artificial blood vessels appear as patented products. In Asian countries, as obtained by “traditional” fermentation methods, BNC is marketed as “nata de coco”, a low-calorie sweetened dessert and high-fiber food. The technological production and use of BNC, however still meets significant challenges. This presentation will overview the potential uses of BNC in several food applications. Further, it will outline the major steps in taking an idea or a technology to market, growing the venture and securing a successful exit. It will present BC Technologies (Bacterial Cellulose Technologies), a spin-off from the University of Minho (Portugal). Through R&D activities, networking & partnering with industry, BCT aims to bring new and improved solutions, based on BNC, to the food sector, biomedical, composites, and pulp and paper industries. Examples of successful product development and industry networking in the food sector will be shown. Finally, plans to produce and commercialize bacterial cellulose for food applications, through a cost-effective production system, will be presented.

Speaker
Biography:

Dimitra P Houhoula is an Assistant Professor of the Department of Food Technology, of Technological Educational Institute of Athens. She has a great experience in molecular techniques related to the identification of foodborne pathogens, food allergens and food adulteration. She served as an academic and research staff in NTUA (Greece) as well as in Ministry of National Defense (Institute of Defense Analysis). She has published more than 20 papers in peer-reviewed journals, and more than 40 presentations in national and international conferences. She has been working as a coordinator and partner in national and international scientific projects about Food Safety & Health.

Abstract:

Food authentication is an issue that has become increasingly important in recent years, due to the drive for more accurate and truthful labeling. European and global food policies require that food put on the market is authentic. The tools for the authentication of foods include protein rely on immunological or electrophoretic and chromatographic assays. Metabolite analysis is based mainly on HPLC, NMR, MS and DNA analyses. Protein and lipid-based methods are less effective, since the target biomarkers could be modified throughout the processing treatments, as they are affected by environmental conditions and industrial procedures. The most important techniques have been proved are those of DNA, thanks to the stability of DNA under production and processing techniques applied along the food-chain. However, methods using DNA analysis enable identifications from immature life stages, or fragmentary remains, offering a powerful tool to address the validation of food authenticity and traceability of primary products. Recently, the major technical advances in the analysis of DNA polymorphisms have occurred in SNPs detection. The usefulness of SNPs, as well as all the markers that reveal polymorphisms in the sequence of the bases, should be evaluated for each matrix or food product, considering the possible chemical changes that the industrial processing or storage conditions may induce in DNA sequence. Also, a gold nanoprobe strategy has developed which relies on the colorimetric differentiation of specific DNA sequences, based approach on differential aggregation profiles in the presence or absence of specific target hybridization.

Andrea Gomez-Zavaglia

Center for Research and Development in Food Cryotechnology, Argentina

Title: Synthesis of prebiotics as monitor by infrared spectroscopy
Speaker
Biography:

Andrea Gomez-Zavaglia has completed his PhD in 2000 at the National University of La Plata (Argentina) and Post-doctoral studies at the University of Coimbra (Portugal) and Max Planck Institute (Germany). She became a member of the Research Career from the Argentinean Research Council (CONICET) in 2004, and then became the leader of the group "Spectroscopic Methods in Food Microbiology" at the Center for Research and Development in Food Cryotechnology (CIDCA, Argentina). She has published more than 110 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as editor or as an Editorial Board Member of different reputed journals. She has been a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Vigo, Autonomous of Madrid (Spain), and Paris 7 (France) and has consolidated collaborations with international reputed groups and enterprises from Portugal, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, Poland, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, Peru, Mexico and Argentina.

Abstract:

Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) are well recognized prebiotics, that is, non-digestible food components that beneficially affect the host health by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon. From a chemical point of view, FOS are composed of fructose units linked by (21)-β-glycosidic bonds and a single D-glucosyl unit at the non-reducing end of the chain. In most cases, FOS are mixtures of oligosaccharides with degree of polymerization from 3 to 6. As the composition of FOS is determined by the synthesis conditions, the goals of this work were: a) to engineer FOS of different composition by adjusting the sucrose concentration used as initial substrate; b) to define partial least square (PLS) based-models to quantify all the sugars present in the reaction medium directly from the FTIR spectra. The progress of the reactions was followed by HPLC. The yield of each reaction was calculated as the percentage of initial sucrose converted to each oligosaccharide. In parallel, the reactions were monitored by FTIR. Six different PLS models aiming at determining the concentration of each carbohydrate present in the reaction medium were calibrated and independently validated. The means of predicted values fitted nicely those obtained by HPLC. Determining FOS composition directly from the FTIR spectra enables obtaining reliable information with strong impact at both academy and industrial level.

Speaker
Biography:

Elena Poverenov has completed her PhD in Organic Chemistry from Weizmann Institute of Science in 2009 and Post-doctoral studies in Polymers and Material Chemistry in Weizmann Institute of Science. Since 2011, she is working as a Research Scientist in the Institute of Postharvest and Food Sciences at Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center. Her research group is implementing new advanced approaches from chemical science to improve quality and safety of food and agricultural products. She has published 30 papers in international journals including top journals, such as Nature and JACS and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member.

Abstract:

Edible coatings are a promising approach for controlling the quality and extending the storability of food products. Edible coatings are based on natural, biodegradable and edible components that satisfy environmental concerns and respond to customer demands for safe and healthy food. Active edible coatings may protect food products from mechanical, physical, and microbial damage and also deliver beneficial components. In our research, we utilize advanced nanotechnology approaches, to develop highly effective, safe and applicable edible coating for various food products. Layer-by-Layer (LbL) approach enables to control properties and functionality of edible coatings. Natural polysaccharides-based coatings were implemented for various fresh fruits utilizing LbL method and were found to possess the beneficial properties of all ingredients, combining good adhesion to food matrix of the inner polyanion layer with beneficial activity of the outer polycation layer. The LbL coating slowed down tissue texture degradation prevented an increase in headspace CO2 and ethanol the signs of hypoxic stress and off-flavor and effectively inhibited microbial spoilage allowing significant elongation of fruit shelf life. Nanoemulsions were also utilized to incorporate active agent, food sourced citral, into a coating matrix. The properties and functionality of the nano-emulsified active edible films were compared to those of the coarse-emulsified films. The effect of active edible coatings on quality, storability and microbial safety of the food products was examined on fresh-cut melon model. Active coatings demonstrated improvement of physiological parameters of the fruit and reduction of the bacterial growth.

Speaker
Biography:

Shahzad Ali Shahid Chatha is a regular Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Government College University Faisalabad, Pakistan and presently working/contributing his skills and expertise in waste water treatment research project as Post-doctoral Fellow in the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

Abstract:

The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenolic compounds from seven different cultivars of Daucus carota and their antioxidant properties. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detector was used, for the determination of phenolic compounds. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids and derivatives in Daucus carota extracts. 5-caffeolquinic acid was a major hydroxycinnamic acid (From 30.26 mg/100 g to 65.39 mg/100 g) detected in different Daucus carota cultivars. The detectable phenolic contents in different cultivars decreased in the following order: DC-Purple > DC3-Red > T29-Red > D90-Red > DCW-Red > DC-White > DC-Yellow i.e., 54.62, 20.29, 19.71, 18.72, 17.07, 16.15 and 12.80 mg/100 g, respectively. Antioxidant activity was measured using three in vitro assays viz. Hydroxyl radical averting capacity (HORAC), Hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (HORSA), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Among Daucus carota cultivars, significant differences (P<0.05) were obtained with respect to antioxidant composition and antioxidant activity. Total phenolics and total Total ascorbic acid varied from 30.26 to 65.39 mg/100 g fresh weight (fw) and 41.12 to 58.36 mg/100 g fw respectively. DC-purple cultivar was found to be rich source of phenolics and ascorbic acid with very high antioxidant activity.

Speaker
Biography:

Yahya Shafiei Bavil Oliaei has finished his academic educations on Veterinary Medicine (DVM) from Islamic Azad University of Tabriz Branch in the year 2006. He did his PhD degree in Food Hygiene from Islamic Azad University, Science & Research Branch of Tehran in 2012. He is a Faculty Member of Department of Food Science & Technology of Islamic Azad University, Khoy Branch, Iran, since 2007. His teaching experiences are dairy science and technology, meat science, food microbiology, food quality control, statistics, and principle of food packaging for undergraduate and graduate students. He is a member of Board of Directors of World Wide Traditional Cheese Association, former member of Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), and member of Society for Anaerobic Microbiology (SAM). He is a Research Member of Tabriz Central Library. He has published more than 20 research papers, books, and scientific reports in recent years. He is reviewer of some national and international scientific journals. He has the experience of organizing scientific conferences and workshops for students and food scientists. Now, he is contributing in writing an Encyclopedia and Handbook in the field of Cheese and Food Bio-Engineering

Abstract:

This study aimed to evaluate the emulsion technique for microencapsulation of L. plantarum using alginate/resistant-starch mixed gel and to develop a new method for evaluating the viability of entrapped bacteria and their release process. A mixture of sodium alginate (2% w/v) and resistant starch (2% w/v), containing bacterial suspension (1% v/v) was used in microencapsulation. The morphology of microcapsules was studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The viability of the entrapped bacteria as well as their ability to release was studied using light microscopy. A wet-mount smear of microcapsules was prepared, slightly stained by Lugol’s iodine, and studied before and after releasing at the presence of Na+ ions. The stability of microcapsules in Bile Salts Solution (BSS), Simulated Gastric Juice (SGJ), Pancreatin Enzymes Solution (PES), and Phosphate Buffer Solution (PBS) were studied with and without 400 rpm mechanical shaking. The prepared microcapsules were spherical, with the mean size of 14.84 μm, containing 1.7×109 cfu g-1 viable cells. Direct microscopic observations indicated that each microcapsule contained one or more living bacterial cells. Bacterial cells were weekly stained and their brownian motion could be traced inside the microcapsules and after being released. The stability of microcapsules was respectively 60 and 90 min. in BSS and PES without mechanical shaking, and 30 min. at rest conditions. The present study indicated that the emulsion technique is an efficient method for microencapsulation of L. plantarum and the new suggested method could be successfully used for evaluating the viability of entrapped bacteria and their release process.

Speaker
Biography:

Sarah Nasser is an Agro Food Engineer and started her 3-years of thesis. The thesis is supported by CNIEL (The French Dairy Industry Inter-Professional Organization) and is integrated within a wider program about the storage of milk powder (involving several thesis and post doctorate). The objective of her thesis is to understand and quantify the evolution of function and structure of Native Phospho Casein powder during ageing and linking with initial state. A part of her thesis purpose is to quantify evolutions of different functional properties of NPC. She has presented her results at IDF World Dairy Summit in 2015 and won the second best poster award.

Abstract:

Background: Spray dryed powders containing some caseins are commonly produced in dairy industry. It is widely admitted that the structure of casein evolves during powder storage, inducing a loss of solubility. However, few studies evaluated accurately the destabilization mechanisms at molecular and mesoscopic level, in particular for Native Phospho Casein powder (NPC). Consequently, at the state of the art, it is very difficult to assess which secondary structure change or crosslinks initiate insolubility during storage. To address this issue, controlled ageing conditions have been applied to a NPC powder (which was obtained by spray drying a concentrate containing a higher content of casein (90%), whey protein (8%) and lactose (few %)). Evolution of structure and loss of solubility, with the effects of temperature and time of storage were systematically reported. Methods: FTIR spectroscopy, Raman and Circular Dichroism were used to monitor changes of secondary structure in dry powder and in solution after rehydration. Besides, proteomic tools and electrophoresis have been performed after varying storage conditions for evaluating aggregation and post translational modifications, like lactosylation or phosphorylation. Finally, Tof Sims and MEB were used to follow in parallel evolution of structure in surface and skin formation due to storage. Results & Conclusion: These results highlight the important role of storage temperature in the stability of NPC. It is shown that the rise of post translational modifications, disulphide bridges and physical cross link seems to contribute to the destabilisation of structure and aggregation of casein. A relative quantification of each kind of cross link, source of aggregates, is proposed. In addition, it has been proved that migration of lipids and formation of skin in surface during the ageing also explains the evolution of structure casein and thus the alterations of functional properties of NPC powder.

Speaker
Biography:

Choijilsuren Narangerel received her PhD in Technology on Soft Cheese from goat’s milk (Food Science) from the Russian East-Siberia State Technological University, Ulan-Ude, in the year 2003. Currently, she is working as Director of Research and Innovation at the Institute of Technology (IT) in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Her researching activities include Mongolian pasture livestock milk features such as goat and mare's milk quality characteristics, goat's milk soft cheese producing technology using propionic acid bacteria, preparation of probiotic micro-organism that are used for the production of fermented dairy products. She has published more than 60 research articles in both national and international reputed journals and is also serving as an Editorial Board Member of reputed Mongolian journal “Human and Food”. In addition, she attended the presentations at international scientific conferences in Russia, South Korea, Greece and China. Also, her research work “Starter culture of Tarag with a natural symbiotic” was selected one of the best Mongolian scientific works in 2013.

Abstract:

Mongolians have a tradition of producing a variety of products from cattle, horse, sheep, goats and mares milk. The number of Mongolian livestock has reached 56 million, while 23.5 million of them are goats and livestock per person is one cattle and horse, 7 goats, 8 sheep and 0.12 Camel. We are working on a research to determine the milk yield and the unique composition of Mongolian pasture goats milk, explore the relation between the hair color /white and black/ of goat, consumption characteristics and produce functional dairy products using goat’s milk, such as goat's milk soft cheese. During our research and experiments, we are utilizing widely used standardized methods, guidelines, laboratory equipment, such as; ion-exchange chromatography and gas, liquid chromatography, mass absorption spectrophotometry, kjeldahl and soxhlet methods etc. Specific compositions of the protein amino acids components, carbohydrates, fat, minerals, enzymes and immune substances of Mongolian pasture goats are showing that it is a good quality product for food, child nutrition, treatment and spa food. It is also related to the Mongolian traditions of replacing breast-milk with goat’s milk and also uses it for a variety of health treatments. It has been proven that biotransformation of cheese, which has a part of propionic acid bacteria (P. shermanii), contains large qualities of volatile acids, soluble proteins, flavor forming compounds and plays a great role in producing the specific taste and quality of the product. Research findings revealed that goat’s milk functional properties depended on the hair color of goats because fat acids in the milk were different in samples from goats with different hair color. The milk sampled from white haired goats was found to have a higher amount of unsaturated fatty acids than that found in the milk from black haired goats. Since Mongolia has a rich source of non-cow’s milk, especially the rich source of goat’s milk, it is really important to build advanced technology, modern research methods and inventing new special milk composition. As well as, producing brand products, processing new technology, increasing the income of the herders and finding a new process for exporting the product.

Speaker
Biography:

Maryam Mirlohi has completed his PhD at the age of 37 years from Isfahan University of Technology. She has been working as an academic in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences n. She has published more than 40 papers in the international journals and has been serving as an the head of Food Sciences and Technology department in the school of nutrition and food sciences in the Isfahan university of medical sciences.

Abstract:

In recent years, functional benefits of probiotics, vitamin D3 as well Cuminum cyminum essential oil have been considered for diabetes management, each, in separate. In this study, production of yogurt with the highest counts of probiotic strain as an adjunct culture and containing different concentrations of vitamin D3 and C. cyminum essential oil and applying different fermentation times was investigated in order to develop a new probiotic product with additional health benefits for diabetes individuals. Central composite design with response surface methodology was used to analyses the effect of different factors (essential oil extract, vitamin D3 and fermentation time ) on the probiotic population in the product. C. cyminum essential oil in four different levels including 0.01'0.02' 0.03' and 0.05% vitamin D3 in five different levels including 20'40' 400' 1000 and 2000 IU and fermentation time in five different levels including 3' 6' 9' 12 and 24 hours were considered as different variables. According to the used model, 15 experimental designs in 20 replications were defined by software and the results were analyzed in SAS software, the effect of each factor was counted as significant at P< 0.05. The combined effect of concentration of C. cyminum essential oil and fermentation time had the most significant effect on the LA7 population followed by the combined effect of C. cyminum essential oil and then with less significant effect, vitamin D3 was effective on the final results with both the power of two and one. Optimized formulation was characterized as the median dose of each factor. The optimized formulation with vitamin D3 and C. cyminum essential oil allows probiotic survival above 107cfu/ ml in yogurt. This functional product can be considered as a functional food for individuals suffers from diabetes.

Speaker
Biography:

Wusgal is a PhD candidate at State key lab of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University. Her research interests focus on prevention of decomposition of folic acid and the decomposition-induced protein structural change.

Abstract:

Folic acid is a synthetic form of the B group vitamin known as folate, which is essential for a variety of physiological processes and plays an important role in the prevention of neural tube defects. However, it decomposes when exposed to UV light. Protein unfolding or decomposition occurred at the same time, due to interaction with folic acid photoproducts and generation of singlet oxygen. In this study, protective effect of resveratrol against photodecomposition of folic acid and decompositioninduced β-lactoglobulin structural change were investigated using fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy, circular dichroism and high performance liquid chromatography. It was found that resveratrol at 10 μM could inhibit photodecomposition of 10 μM folic acid and also the resulting structural change of β-lactoglobulin whether the polyphenol was added before or during UV irradiation. Meanwhile, a decrease in the conversion rate of resveratrol from the trans- to the cis-form and an increase in the degradation of both trans- and cis-resveratrol were detected. The results suggest that resveratrol could be used to control the photodecomposition process of folic acid and prevent against folic acid-induced protein structural change, as it is an effective active oxygen quencher during irradiation.

Speaker
Biography:

Aiyeleye F B has obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry from the University of Lagos, and completed his PhD at the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria. He has over 30 years of teaching experience in Food Processing and Preservation. He has authored and co-authored books and publications in peer-reviewed journals. He has served as Head of Department and Dean of the Faculty, at different times in his career. He also provides consultancy services to various food processing industries.

Abstract:

Kokoro is a rod-like, crunchy, and predominantly deep-fried corn-based food snack commonly consumed in south-western Nigeria. Increasing demand, complexity and labour intensive process underscores the need for improved processing. The effect of different moulding methods and packaging on the storage of kokoro was investigated. Traditionally processed kokoro served as control. Results showed that, moulding methods have no significant effect on the nutritional composition of the kokoro. Twin-screw extruded kokoro stored in vacuum packed high density polyethylene (HDPE) had better sensory (color, flavour, texture and taste) and higher keeping qualities (low total plate count and peroxide value) than kokoro from other moulding methods and reference sample. The storage stability studies showed that, bacterial loads for hand rolled and market samples were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those of twin-screw extruded kokoro. Manually extruded kokoro stored in low density polyethylene (LDPE) had highest total plate counts. Twin-screw extruded kokoro samples stored in HDPE had the least total plate counts. This work showed that, twin-screw extrusion and HDPE could serve as improved moulding method and packaging material for kokoro.