Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Food Chemistry and Hydrocolloids Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Cuie Yan

PepsiCo Global R&D, USA

Keynote: Factors controlling the deterioration of spray dried active food ingredients

Time : 10:00 to 10:25

OMICS International Food Chemistry 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cuie Yan photo
Biography:

Cuie Yan possesses a PhD in Polymer Chemistry and Physics, and completed BS in Nutrition. She is a Principal Scientist with PepsiCo, with 20+ years of technical expertise in both industry and academia across Chemistry, Physics, Biomedicine, Pharmacy, Nutrition, Food and Beverages. She has authored 30+ articles in scientific journals and 2 book chapters; and filed 6 patents and commercialized 2 of them that have been generating $20+ million annual revenue since 2008. She has been serving as a reviewer for 5+ top-ranked scientific journals on Food Science and Biotechnologies; as well as an Editor for Journal of Bio Accent.

Abstract:

Despite many years of research, both academia and industry still struggle with improving the shelf-life of active food ingredients (e.g. flavor oils, polyunsaturated oils, natural pigments, vitamins, highly volatile components). Microencapsulation has been serving as an effective way to preserve them, to control their release rate, and/or to mask their unpleasant odor or taste. Among a variety of microencapsulation methods, spray drying is most widely used due to its ease of processing and low operating cost. Significant progress has been made on microencapsulation formulations, processes, and evaluation technologies in the past decade. This presentation reviews the most recent remarkable progresses; discusses factors controlling the deterioration of active food ingredients microencapsulated by spray drying; and offers thoughts as to ways to improve upon the current practices.

Keynote Forum

Cornelia M Witthöft

Linnaeus University, USA

Keynote: Folate and health – still a challenge in food and nutrition science

Time : 10:25 to 10:50

OMICS International Food Chemistry 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cornelia M Witthöft photo
Biography:

Cornelia M Witthöft has completed her PhD in Nutrition Science at Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. She was working as a Researcher at the Institute of Food Research in Norwich, UK, and received an EC Marie Curie grant for Post-doc studies at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, where she stayed for 16 years. Currently, she is working as a Professor in Food Science at Linnaeus University in Kalmar, Sweden. She is a member of the national expert panel for Nutrition and Public Health and was appointed member of the “Folate Expert Group” for the recent revision of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations.

Abstract:

It is well recognized that a good folate status is linked to several health benefits. Recently also attention has been given to the role of folate on the mediation of one-carbon metabolism. Mandatory food fortification with folic acid was therefore introduced in several countries to successfully improve the population’s folate status. However, other national health authorities decided against mandatory fortification and rely on other approaches to improve the dietary folate intake (e.g. by increasing the consumption of foods naturally rich in folate and folate-rich ingredients, or (novel) foods with increased folate content from bioprocessing). The presentation gives an overview on how methods of food processing or bioprocessing and storage affect the retention of the vitamin. Some examples on research aiming to develop novel foods with increased folate content will be presented. The challenging task to determine the vitamin’s bioavailability and bioefficacy will be discussed. Finally, the presentation will give insights into the metabolic effects of dietary intervention with different folate forms (synthetic folic acid versus natural food folate) by initial results from ongoing research. Principles of study designs and findings from long-term and short-term human trials will be presented in order to explain why there are still today inconclusive data regarding dietary folate bioavailability.rnrn

  • Chemistry of Food |Functionality and Behaviour of Hydrocolloids | Cereal Chemistry and Sea Food Chemistry | Chemistry behind Meat and Poultry Processing | Processing, Fortification and Packaging of Food | Recent Advancement in Food Science and Food Business
Location: Algonquin AB
Speaker
Biography:

Rachel Wicklund, PhD leads the convenience and dairy applications team at Tate & Lyle. Her research focuses on starch-based food product development and applications. She has worked for Tate & Lyle since starting her career as a Food Scientist in 2006. She attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she obtained a Doctorate and a Master’s degree in Food Science and a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering

Abstract:

The effect of starch thickening on the viscosity ratio of the continuous and dispersed phases in emulsions is not often considered, yet it can have an important impact on processing parameters. Salad dressings are typically mixtures of two immiscible liquids, oil and vinegar, often stabilized through the use of emulsifiers. Knowledge of equilibrium phase behavior of emulsions is an essential tool to study the emulsification process and the long-term stability of salad dressings. However, much of the research in emulsion science has focused on characteristics of the emulsifier, such as hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) number, its packing parameter and its solubility. Starch, which is often used as a thickener in salad dressings, can also have a significant impact on emulsion behavior. In particular, starches can affect the viscosity ratio. The viscosity ratio of the 2 phases is the principle factor determining which phase will be continuous and which phase will be dispersed. As the viscosity ratio increases, both the minimum volume fraction of the first phase, which can be continuous and the maximum volume fraction of the first phase that can be dispersed increase. That is, as the viscosity of a phase increases, its tendency to be dispersed increases. This seminar will discuss the effect of starch thickening on the viscosity ratio of the continuous and dispersed phases in salad dressings and the impact on processing parameters leading to emulsion formation and stabilization.

Harmit Singh

California State Polytechnic University, USA

Title: Analysis of red grape skin anthocyanins extracted using sonication
Speaker
Biography:

Harmit Singh has completed his PhD in Organic Chemistry from Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Human Nutrition and Food Science and Director of research and graduate studies in the College of Agriculture at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona CA, USA. His research work is focused on extraction, purification and application of natural food colors. He has published more than 27 papers in reputed journals

Abstract:

Anthocyanins (ACNs) are naturally derived pigments. Their use in foods is limited due to their high cost and instability. The ability to extract more acylated ACNs than non-acylated can be beneficial for the food industry since acylated ACNs are more stable. Red grapes skins after wine production are used to extract ACNs color. About 240 ton (US tons) of red grapes are crushed every years to produce color. The more applications of natural food colors will add significant value to the crops and help boost the economic benefits to the growers and processors directly and indirectly. The use of ultrasound for extraction purposes can facilitate the diffusion of solvents by breaking the grape skin cell walls. During this study sonication and homogenization methods were compared using methanol, ethanol and water under acidic and non-acidic conditions at different temperatures. Spectrometeric pH differential method and Reverse-phase HPLC method were used to compare extraction yield of total and individual ACNs respectively. Samples homogenized in methanol pre-heated to 60°C extracted the highest amount of ACNs where as sonication at power 6 in acidified water extracted the highest amount of ACNs. HPLC analysis indicated that in all samples cyanidin 3-glucoside, peonidin 3-glucoside, and malvidin 3-glucoside were the most common extracted monomeric ACNs. Interestingly acylated ACNs were not extracted and non-acylated ACNs group was predominant as indicated by the HPLC.

Speaker
Biography:

Jian Lu has completed his PhD from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Post-doctoral studies from University of Florida. He is a Professor of Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute

Abstract:

EDCs are substances that interfere with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action resulting in a deviation from normal homeostatic control or reproduction. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been attracting public attention because of their negative effects on human health and wide occurrence in various environments and foodstuffs. There is growing interest concerning the possible food safety posed by endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in coastal zone. Isotope dilution method was developed for monitoring the potential bioaccumulation of typical EDCs in the vegetables and fruits in coastal zone. Accumulation of EDCs in vegetables and fruits from coastal zone with intensive reclaimed water irrigation was observed. The estimated daily intake of EDCs was beyond the recommended acceptable daily intake (ADI) for children as recommended by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). The accumulation of EDCs in vegetables and fruits indicates a potential thread of EDCs to human health through the food chain in coastal zone with intensive reclaimed water irrigation. The rapid accumulation of EDCs using edible intertidal macroalgae indicates another potential thread of EDCs to human health through the food chain in coastal zone. Financial support from One Hundred-Talent Plan of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) is gratefully acknowledged.

Elisa June Teresa McGee

University of Toronto, Canada

Title: The development of iron fortified tea
Speaker
Biography:

Elisa June Teresa McGee is expecting her PhD degree in 2016 at the University of Toronto. Her passion for food technology was refined while studying chemical engineering and applied chemistry. She was awarded with large scholarships/fellowships for each year of graduate school and has won a Canadian Institute of Food Science & Technology Toronto Section Scholarship and a Best Contributions Award at the International Conference on Bioencapsulation for her work in food fortification

Abstract:

Iron deficiency is the most widespread nutritional disorder but may be combated though fortification of commonly consumed centrally processed food. Tea is an ideal candidate because, aside from water, it is the most consumed beverage globally. Fortification may be achieved at low cost by adhering iron to the tea leaves during processing, such that the iron will detach when the tea is brewed. However, the phenolic compounds in tea contain ortho-dihydroxyl groups (gallol and catecholmoieties) which complex iron. These complexes are not bioavailable and are highly colored. This iron-polyphenol reaction is known to be pH dependent such that it does not occur, or even reverses, at pH 1. Therefore the pH levels of concern are that of brewed tea (~pH 5) and that of the small intestine (~pH 7) where the iron and polyphenols are absorbed into the body. A method for the quantification of iron-polyphenol complex formation was developed such that spectrophotometry may be used with gallic acid to generate calibration curves. This was used to compare the formation of iron complexes with gallic acid and black tea polyphenols with different iron sources and stabilizers. Reducing agents were one class of stabilizers studied. Of these, sodium ascorbate and sodium metabisulfite hindered iron complex formation at pH 5 but not at pH 7. Other stabilizers are currently being investigated.

Speaker
Biography:

Weichang (David) Liu, PhD is a research fellow specializing in texturants, innovation and commercial development at Tate & Lyle. He has more than a decade of experience in Food Science Research and Development. Before joining Tate & Lyle, he worked for Unilever and PepsiCo in China, where he led the Nanotechnology and Technical Science insight teams respectively. He holds a Doctorate degree in Material Science from Tsinghua University (China) and conducted Post-doctoral research in Italy, Germany and Australia.

Abstract:

This session will delve into the key technology strategies that can be used to guide the design and production of novel-starch based ingredients that allow proper control of retrogradation. The term "retrogradation" is widely used in the starch field and refers to the sequence of phenomena that occur after starch is cooked in water, cooled, and then held over time. Starch retrogradation usually decreases the quality of food products, affects the nutritional properties, and shortens the shelf-life. Starch retrogradation is influenced by storage conditions, starch chain structure, and interactions of amylose and amylopectin with other food components. Chemical modification, physical modification and biotechnical modification are the main technology strategies used to control starch retrogradation. Chemical modification changes the molecular structure of starch by introducing functional groups to obstruct starch chain recrystallization and hinder the aggregation of helical structure. Physical modification is implemented by treating starch under certain temperature, moisture and pressure conditions. Starch interaction with food components, such as sugars, salts, proteins, lipids, and non-starch polysaccharides is another important approach to control retrogradation, and the affecting mechanism of different food components varies. Biotechnological modification controls starch bio-synthesis and manipulates chain length distribution and fine structure. Novel starches produced with this method possess unique retrogradation behaviors. Enzymes change the starch chain structure (chain length and branching degree) and affect the starch retrogradation as well. These technology strategies can be used to guide the design and production of novel starch-based ingredients and allows for the proper control of retrogradation in a broad range of food applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Abdolamir Allameh is a Professor of Biochemistry at the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran. He has published more than 100 research papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Gamma irradiation is an efficient method for sterilization of food commodities including spices and dry fruits. However, the effects of irradiation on the quality and biological properties of these products have not been fully elucidated. Changes in the composition and properties of essential oils produced from seeds after irradiation is an approach to study the effect of this treatment on the product quality. Caraway (Carum carvi L., Umbelliferae) is usually irradiated before storage and oil extraction. In this study the impact of γ-irradiation on the chemical composition, anti-bacterial and antioxidant properties of the caraway essential oils has been examined. In a laboratory scale experiment, fresh caraway seeds pouches (50 g each pack) in heat-sealed polyethylene pouches and passed once by a Co60 source for irradiation using Co60 Gammacell 220 (10 and 25 kGy). The antibacterial effects of the essential oil samples were assessed by disk diffusion method. This assay was performed by growth inhibition of Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213). Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oil from caraway pre-treated with irradiation were determined. Moreover the radicalscavenging capacity (DPPH) and β-Carotene-Linoleic Acid assays were performed to examine the effect of irradiation on the antioxidant activity of essential oils prepared from caraway. Comparative results show that the chemical composition of the oil samples regardless of the irradiation at doses of 10 and 25 kGy was similar to untreated seeds. Accordingly, the antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the seeds were unaffected by irradiation. These data clearly show that γ-irradiation of caraway is an efficacious method of sterilization, which retains the quality of the product and its biological activities.

Speaker
Biography:

Li Liang has completed her PhD from Fudan University in China and Post-doctoral studies from Laval University in Canada. She is a Professor of State Key Lab of Food Science and Technology and School of Food Science and Technology of Jiangnan University in China. She has published about 30 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Functional foods containing bioactive nutrients offer benefits beyond basic nutrition and hence the possibility of delaying and preventing chronic diseases. Many bioactive nutrients degrade rapidly under normal food processing and storage. Encapsulation can be used to overcome these limitations. Milk proteins have been widely used as carrier materials because of their ability to form emulsions and to interact with bioactive nutrients. Except in the case of bioactive molecules dissolved in the inner phase of an emulsion-based carrier, entrapped bioactive nutrients generally interact with the carrier material. Milk proteins could interact with many bioactive nutrients to form complexes, improving hydrosolubility and stability of bioactive nutrients. β-Lactoglobulin, which contains multiple ligand-binding sites, could interact simultaneously with α-tocopherol, resveratrol and folic acid to form protein-multi-ligand complexes. Moreover, bioactive nutrients could possibly bind to protein membrane at the oil-water interface of emulsions. The data suggest the potential to prepare the delivery system based on milk protein for simultaneous encapsulation of multiple bioactive nutrients. These should be useful for the development of functional foods fortified with a range of bioactive nutrients and offering multiple health benefits.

Speaker
Biography:

Joseph C Hannon attended the Dublin Institute of Technology, where he obtained an Honours degree in Mechanical Engineering in 2013. He is currently carrying out a PhD in the area of Nanoparticle Food Packaging Risk Assessment at University College Dublin.

Abstract:

Silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) have been reported to have good antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms and the use of antimicrobial Ag nanocomposite films can potentially extend the shelf life of food products. Despite these benefits, concerns exist related to the potential human exposure to nanoparticles released from food contact materials into food destined for human consumption. In this study, Ag precursor was spray coated on a low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film surface, treated using UV/ozone containing 0.85 wt.% Polystyrene-b-polyethylene oxide (PS-b-PEO) to increase adhesion of Ag NPs on the surface modified LDPE films. The manufactured antimicrobial nanocomposite LDPE films were immersed in pasteurised whole milk and stored at +4°C for 15 days. The release of Ag over time and the effects on the shelf life of milk was monitored. Preliminary results demonstrated that the use of LDPE coated with Ag NPs extended the shelf life of milk. Silver release quantified by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry was found to reach an equilibrium concentration of 6.07 mg/kgmilk after 4 days of storage. Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that Ag NPs were observed in the LDPE surface coating but no Ag NPs were observed in the milk. Considering the absence of Ag NPs in milk, the human exposure was predicted for ionic Ag in milk. Although human exposure to Ag was predicted to exceed the ingestion limit of 0.005 mg/kgbw/day, as outlined by the World Health Organization, this study highlights the potential for further optimisation of this novel packaging material to reduce migration while also extending shelf life.

Speaker
Biography:

Genaro G Amador Espejo recently completed his PhD from Universidad de las Americas Puebla, Mexico in Food Science, with the specialty in Dairy Products. As a part of his Doctoral project, he participated in an international project funded by the European Union at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Further, he has participated in many national and international research meetings and scientific publications regarding application of non-thermal technologies in milk. His interest in food science and food preservation started during his work in several research projects applying emerging technologies

Abstract:

Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization (UHPH) technology has been applied in milk as an alternative to heat treatment. It is based on the traditional homogenization applied in dairy industry, but with improvements in seat valve material, which help to reach pressures up to 350 MPa. The main parameters in UHPH process are the operating pressure (100 to 350 MPa), inlet temperature and the number of passes (which is a reinsertion of the product in to the equipment). As a part of the pressure increase in the homogenization valve, there is an increment in fluid temperature. This temperature increase has an important effect on the changes observed in the food matrix. The UHPH application in milk has raised interest because it can reduce the number of industrial processes, from homogenization and pasteurization separated into one process at once. In this sense, the technology has proved to eliminate microorganisms by mechanical mechanisms (cavitation, high speed collisions and shear stress) which increase by pressure, Ti and number of passes increment. Further, an adequate combination of pressure and Ti has proved to be effective to achieve a product with similar shelf life to pasteurized milk and as well eliminate spore in sufficient numbers to obtain sterile milk. Other important changes evaluated as a consequence of the use of the UHPH process in milk are the modification of the fat globule, micelle size, mineral balance, enzymes inactivation, less cooked off-flavor and minor changes in vitamin content, showing the possibility of employing this technology as a heat treatment substitute.

Jun Wu

Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes- Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Title: Heavy metal concentrations and distribution of water, soil, and fish around the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau-A review
Speaker
Biography:

Jun Wu has completed her PhD from Shanghai Jiao Tong University. She is working as a Professor at Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences. She has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, known as the third polar and roof of the world, serves an important role in evaluating long-term ecologic conditions and environmental status and changes of the surroundings over time. Supported by 100-Talent Plan of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), this study summarizes major concentrations in water, soil, and food around the Qinghai- Tibet Plateau based on the previously published data. The soil heavy metal contamination degree and the water heavy metal hazard index were respectively evaluated. The contamination degrees of two sampling areas around the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau showed extremely high levels with soil mCd (modified degree of contamination) values exceeding 20. The hazard indexes of two important rivers have reached unacceptable level (>1). Heavy metals, especially Hg, were also frequently detected in fish of the Plateau. The potential risk might be beyond our expectation. Therefore, it should be an urgent and top priority to identify and confirm possible pollution sources around the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to guarantee the ecological safety and food safety of this area.

M Madhava Naidu

CSIR-Central Food Technological Research Institute, India

Title: Spice and wellness: Current practice and future prospective
Speaker
Biography:

M Madhava Naidu has completed his PhD from Gulbarga University and Post-doctoral studies from Madurai Kamaraj University, and CIRAD, Montpellier, France. He is the Head of the Department of Spice & Flavor Science, a premier constituent laboratory of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Ministry of Science and Technology, Govt. of India. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of Food Science and Technology, Springer. He has also published reviews, books and book chapters. He has 10 know-how process and 20 patents in his credit.

Abstract:

Spices are a group of secretive food adjuncts that have been in use for centuries to enhance the sensory quality of foods. The word ‘spice’ is synonymous with anything that creates a piquant effect. Although spices have never been considered to contribute anything to human nutrition, this group of food adjuncts has been used in human diets for centuries as flavour modifiers to make food more palatable. India has been the house of many important spices like turmeric, pepper, ginger, garlic, cardamom and chilli. India, with its favorable climatic conditions for growing spices, is the largest producer and consumer of spices. During 2015-16, India targeted to export an estimated 12 lakh tonnes of spices and spice products, which are worth more than US$ 2500 million. Dehydrated spices with their bioactive constituents have been shown to have good consumer acceptance as well as shelf life and could serve as a valuable food additive to enhance human nutrition. With the increasing interest in the beneficial role of spice nutraceuticals in health, an in-depth study of the bioactive constitutents of spices assumes significant prominence. In this focus, Department of Spice & Flavour Science, CSIR-CFTRI conducts basic research on spice chemistry, and also involved in the development of new spice-based products, and spice processing machineries. With this background, the main foci of this presentation is to provide a comprehensive review on the recent research/technologies on spice processing, including value addition and its nutraceutical applications and their relationships with human wellbeing.

Speaker
Biography:

Roeb Garcia-Arrazola is currently an Associated Professor in the Department of Food Science and Biotechnology at UNAM focusing on studying Emerging Contaminants in Food within three main perspectives: food processing technologies, risk assessment and Biomaterials.

Abstract:

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDC´s) in food are compounds involuntarily ingested by humans mainly due to migration of particular chemicals from agricultural waters and plastic/metal containers into food products. Endocrine disruptors can be classified based on its chemical properties (pharmaceuticals, food additives, nanomaterials, etc.), based on its cellular effect (DNA methylation, histone acetylation, etc.) or based on its risk assessment. An increasing amount of evidence associates EDC’s exposure with endocrine-related diseases such as: obesity, diabetes, autism, among others. Recent studies indicate that the mother-infant pair during pregnancy might be the most vulnerable population to EDC’s exposure due to critical development stages in the baby. Nevertheless, further studies are needed in order to clarify interactions among health issues and EDC exposure, types of chemicals, bodyweight and age group, among others. Consequently, world health organizations are currently developing a regulatory framework based on scientific evidence. For example, European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has lowered the temporary tolerable daily intake (t-TDI) from 50 to 5 μg/kg-bw/day. Furthermore, France has proposed a precautionary ban on the use of BPA in food containers (currently discussed at the Constitutional Court). In this presentation a critical review on the status quo of EDC’s in food is discussed. Furthermore, experimental findings related to BPA presence in Mexican fruits and vegetables from crop fields and can containers are shown.

Speaker
Biography:

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Abstract:

The study assessed regional differences and effects in berry morphology (skin, pulp and seeds) in relation to chemical compounds. The flavonoids containing in berries (ITF) of the autochthonous cultivar, Shesh i Bardhe of grapevine, in three micro zonals of Albania has been determined with spectrophotometrical method and they ranged from 165.62; 66.36;183.85 respectively for three different eco- climatic zones of Albania. The content of sugar, Brix, was: 13.53 for cv Sh. i Bardhe, Gjirokastra; 17. 5 per cv Sh. i Bardhe, Tirana and 11 for cv Sh.i Bardhe, Sukth. The effect of climatic zones, therefore ripening, was deep in the grape, with drastic variabilities in the different components: the content of sugar Brix, total Acidity, total Index of poliphenols, total flavonoids , colour intensity. Statistic analyses of the data over physic indicator (The weight of the sample, the weight of the berries sample, the weight of rachis sample, coefficient of construction, weight of 100 berries, contents of peeling, the content of the seeds, size of berries (length /width), the index of berries, the coefficient of the berries composition), but even chemical, had a correlation of indicators of research with environmental factors in the vineyard.

Speaker
Biography:

Kamal Jit Singh has completed his PhD from Panjab University and Post-doctoral studies from Panjab University, India. He is a Professor in the Department of Botany and Curator of PNM Botanical Garden of the Institute. He has published 33 research papers in reputed journals and has also guided students for PhD and MPhil degree. The priority areas of his research work are: Physiological and biochemical studies related to nitrogen fixing efficacy of root nodules under abiotic stress conditions aiming at extending their functional life span; heavy metals affecting growth profile and reproductive biology of legume crops; role of polyamines, Ca+2 and Zn+2 in ameliorative studies of heavy metal Cd induced toxicity.

Abstract:

Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. cv. Himachali chana II) and mung bean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek cv. mung 666) genotypes were subjected to varying levels of heavy metal stress (Cd 0.2-0.4 mM) to assess their tolerance towards cadmium induced metal toxicity, its uptake behavior and accumulation in seeds. Chickpea cultivar was affected more due to stress sensitivity towards heavy metal cadmium in comparison to mung bean cultivar in respect to number of seeds and their weight per plant. It was observed that, accumulation of cadmium was much more in the leaves of mung bean in comparison to chickpea, may be due to more leaf surface area of mung bean. Chickpea seeds were found to be hyper-accumulators of cadmium (approximately 100 times) in comparison to mung bean depending upon the heavy metal induced toxicity. Calcium (1.0-2.0 mM) play a significant role in lowering accumulation of cadmium in both leaves and seeds probably affecting its absorption at the surface of roots and its further uptake to above ground parts. Higher calcium treatment was more effective in lowering Cd accumulation in leaves (29-36% chickpea and 42-64% mung bean) and seed (10-15% chickpea and 15-36% mung bean). An interaction of Ca and Cd ions increased number and weight of seeds per plant. Cadmium toxicity can be checked with application of calcium to reduce accumulation levels of the heavy metal. Hence, the interaction was more effective in mung bean cultivar in reducing cadmium accumulation in comparison to chickpea. The efficacy of calcium was more when used in higher concentrations.

Speaker
Biography:

Maryam Mirlohi has completed her PhD from Isfahan University of Technology. She has been working as an academic in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. She has published more than 40 papers in the international journals and has been serving as the Head of Food Sciences and Technology department at the School of Nutrition and Food Sciences in the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences.

Abstract:

Fish and its products are the richest sources of vitamin D3. Concerning the lack of information on the concentration of vitamin D3 content of the commercial canned fish products in Iran and incomplete native food composition tables, present study aimed to investigate the frequency distribution of vitamin D3 in the different kinds of canned fish products offered in the Isfahan market. Commercial canned fish from 10 different common brands containing 5 certain types of fish are collected from the market. Samples undergone oil extraction and the extracted oil was diluted to 125 times in methanol and was used for vitamin D3 measurement by RP-HPLC. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) calculated as 0.05 and 0.04 μg/100 g, respectively. Repeatability and recovery were obtained as 0.18 and 109 respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using Mini Tab program Microsoft Excel. The highest and the lowest concentration of vitamin D3 were measured in canned tuna in vegetable oil (8.51±3.55 μg/100 gr) and canned tuna in brine (0.047±0.3 μg/100 gr), respectively. The results of this study showed that commercial canned fish, especially the ones which have oily medium are rich sources of vitamin D3. Due to the frequent vitamin D3 deficiency in Iran, declaration of the vitamin D3 content of these products in their attached food composition table can promote its community usage. Especially, for the individuals that suffer from vitamin D3 deficiency, canned fish can be introduced as affordable and suitable food source of this vitamin.